Category: Why Permaculture?

Inspiration and a Common Sense Approach

Inspiration and a Common Sense Approach feat

To close out the Permaculture Voices 3, Jack Spirko gave an inspirational talk that covered his journey into sustainability, Permaculture and his belief for moving Permaculture forward to the tipping point. Jack has an ability to take an obstacle and not only come up with a sensible solution, but to take it a step further and look at that problem from a number of different ways and work it through […]

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Agari Permaculture Farm

Agari Permaculture Farm

A film about Agari Permaculture Farm showing their amazing cob house, earthbag dome, kitchen/social area, and the awesome people who were there! Living the Change This film was made as part of our Living the Change series. For this series we’re traveling around New Zealand making short documentary films about permaculture farms, tiny houses, and sustainability. Connect with Jordan Website: http://happenfilms.com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jordosmond Support Happen Films I release all of […]

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Living Simply in a Tiny Off Grid Cabin

Living Simply in a Tiny Off Grid Cabin

Tom, Sarah, and their daughter Neesa all live in a tiny 20sqm off grid cabin on a property on the Coromandel Peninsula, New Zealand. Instead of paying rent, they share the work of looking after the land with the owners and both families share in the farm’s abundant produce.

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Abundance from Small Spaces

Abundance-from-small-spaces

It’s all about habitat. If you create the right habitat, you get what you need. I often ask people, “What is the biggest predator in this garden?” The answer, of course, is “us” because that’s what it’s designed for. Before we were farmers, we were hunter-gatherers. What the word ‘forest’ (from the Anglo-Norman) means is not ‘trees’ at all, but ‘the king’s hunting ground.’ So, what we are doing in creating forest gardens is to get ourselves back as close as we can to being hunter-gatherers: less work, more harvest, no pollution, making the system as self-fertile as possible, recycling wastes into nutrients, and entirely dependent on the best nuclear reactor of all—the sun, and on the rain (or other precipitation) and wind cycles which are driven by the sun’s energy.

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Standard to Establish Framework for Sustainable Agriculture Released by ASABE

picking vegetables

A standard that establishes a framework for charting progress toward sustainable agricultural production has just been completed by The American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE). This is known as ANSI/ASABE S629, Framework to Evaluate the Sustainability of Agricultural Production Systems. It includes provisions for defining and benchmarking key performance indicators, setting goals, implementing strategies for continuous improvements, and reporting improvements. It is geared for use with all typical […]

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How to Measure Success with Gardening

How to Measure Success with Gardening

Part of the beauty of permaculture is our work in gardening. It informs our thinking in food production, and it guides our approach to the land. It is a way of thinking that is central to permaculture. It’s a way of thinking that is nurturing and sustainable and inclusive of humans. That requires human input in a way that is considered. A garden is human interaction with the land’s food production systems.

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Why We Do Things The “Hard Way”

farmer's Hands

During the past year or so I have frequently wondered why we do things the hard way. Surely it is a lot easier to get a 9-5 job, drive a nice car, have a nice house, buy all our food and just live a “normal” life? Okay, so that would most likely mean mortgage, car loan, and credit cards but everyone else does it, why not us? It is an attractive proposition for someone struggling to make ends meet whilst living the Permaculture Dream.

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Permaculture Ethics – Making Them Work

Empy Hands

“A man is ethical only when life, as such, is sacred to him, that of plants and animals as that of his fellow men, and when he devotes himself helpfully to all life that is in need of help.” – Albert Schweitze

The ethical principles of Permaculture set it apart from other design disciplines, as their inclusion guides the actions and goals of the designer.

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‘Silent Spring’ Triggered an Environmental Movement

Silent-Spring-Headline

The book ‘Silent Spring’ triggered an environmental movement and as such we have known the toxic effects of chemical agriculture, basically from the very beginning. We have suffered both massive environmental damage, disease and pest resistance, and human health issues.

Silent Spring is a 1962 environmental science book by Rachel Carson. The book documented the detrimental effects on the environment—particularly on birds—of the indiscriminate use of pesticides.

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Geoff Lawton – Expertise

geoff lawton expertise

As a discipline that tries to create sustainable systems, permaculture is wonderfully diverse. You don’t just develop expertise as a gardener or as a farmer, but you also work with ideas from water, waste, from energy systems and architecture. You engage in the spectrum of human knowledge, and this is intensely rewarding. It is how we come to develop holistic systems that are sustainable. This diversity can also be daunting. […]

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Announcing the First Programme Details – Geoff and Nadia Lawton

Geoff-Nadia-Lawton

The Permaculture Research Institute (PRI) is excited to announce that Geoff and Nadia Lawton will be attending this year’s British Permaculture Convergence to present a series of workshops. Presenters include: Geoff Lawton – Permaculture Research Institute Setting up demonstration sites as education centres & training permaculture project managers Permaculture Earthworks design and implementation Nadia Lawton School gardens across the world Working with tribal women Matt Ralston & Adrian Lovett Making […]

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Growing Local – Eating Local

Fresh produce

One of life’s simple pleasures would have to be going to the local Farmers Market for the weekly shopping. The hubbub of chatter, cooking, banging and rattling. Talking to the people who actually produce your food. The smells, the sights, the touch on your skin. The sense of being part of a food system that is whole and sustaining. Local Farmers Markets are popping up everywhere and are in great […]

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