Category: Why Permaculture?

A Site Specific Nuts and Bolts of Zone 1 Gardening in Rio Dulce: Tropical Wet/Dry Climate

feat Sweet Potato, Chaya, Habenero, Okra, Cuban Oregano, and More - Copy

Recently, I put together an article outlining the (or my) basic theory of Zone 1 gardening, both for a specific NGO project I’m working on as well as in the hopes that it might be helpful for others in similar situations. For it, I wanted to present broad, accessible ideas that could apply across the spectrum of climates and, in the case of charity projects, cultural practices. Ultimately, though, we […]

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What We All Can Do Now To Make Change Happen Overnight

What We All Can Do Now To Make Change Happen Overnight 02

We can’t all transition into a self-sufficient homestead or eco-village setting overnight, but that doesn’t mean we can’t transition our entire community locally starting today. If everyone just started growing their own food, buying the rest of their food locally, saving seed, & composting all our organic waste, the world overnight would change. There are several things that would happen. We’d all save money and eat better food. Food costs […]

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Film – A Simpler Way: Crisis as Opportunity (Premiere)

Film - A Simpler Way Crisis as Opportunity

The overlapping economic, environmental, and cultural crises of our times can seem overwhelming, can seem like challenges so great and urgent that they have no solutions. But rather than sticking our heads in the sand or falling into despair, we should respond with defiant positivity and try to turn the crises we face into opportunities for civilisational renewal. Trailer Courtesy of Happen Films Youtube Channel During the year of 2015 […]

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Policies for a Post-Growth Economy

Fully laden container ship in port

The 1972 publication of Limits to Growth sparked a controversy that has yet to subside. This book argued that if population, resource use, and pollution kept increasing on our finite planet, eventually economies would face environmental ‘limits to growth’ – with potentially dire consequences. Although evidence is mounting in support of this position (Turner, 2014; Steffan et al, 2015), any suggestion that nations might have to give up economic growth, […]

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A Basic Introduction to Zone One Garden Theory

What Isn’t Path Is Growing Food (Emma Gallagher) Feat

Recently, my wife Emma and I were asked to introduce zone one permaculture to women in about 15 or so indigenous villages around Rio Dulce, in southeastern Guatemala. Seeing as we had only a couple of weeks to get the project completed, my initial reaction was one of panic. Suddenly, the DRAs (daily recommended allowances) of these women’s families were on our shoulders, and somehow we were supposed to visit […]

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From Finance to Farmer – Incredible Permaculture Farm Created in Just 3 Years!

Finace to garmer

Andrew Martin once worked in the finance industry, but after leaving that life, he and his wife Beth moved to New Zealand and developed an amazing permaculture property in just 3 years!

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Geoff Lawton – What is Permaculture

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In these video’s, Courtesy of the PRIs’ own Youtube Channel, the Permaculture Research Institutes own Geoff Lawton gives you a brief overview of what Permaculture is.

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Jordan Recap

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Well I have returned from Jordan not entirely fit and well. I managed to get a touch of the flu during the two weeks but still managed to facilitate the course. It was a great experience to go to Jordan and spend time on a site that is around 350 meters below sea level. Man what a place . The soil is just very degraded highly alkaline dirt that doesn’t […]

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Why It’s Better to Use the Slow Approach to Charitable Permaculture Projects

An abundant expanse of food—flax, chia, beans, corn, quinoa, mustard, etc.—growing at Project Somos in Guatemala. It feeds at-risk families every day.

I began working with international nonprofits about eight years ago, first as an English teacher in Palestine and Guatemala. Having elected to retire early (at about 35) from the teaching game, I’m now regularly approached by organizations interested in including permaculture projects in their game plan. For me, this switch has been very exciting. I am able to continue to work towards a better future for and with others, while […]

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Cuba’s Big Lesson, Authentic Teachers, and “Solar-Powered Carpets”

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Our April 8th edition of the “Friday Five” went out to all subscribers on GeoffLawtonOnline.com yesterday. It highlights: How to make your own natural swimming pool Carpet-like solar power Lessons from Cuba’s sustainable development An incredible new online project: Women who Farm Another new mini-video from Geoff reflecting on his days with Bill Mollison See the full Friday Five post (and all past ones) here. Moving forward, the Friday Five […]

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It’s the Time of the Season and the Moon is Bright: Time-Stacking, Planting by the Moon and Other Marvels Tic Toc-ing Along

Time-Stacked Garden Bed

To be completely honest, the time element of permaculture is something that hasn’t gotten its due attention from me, but coming to this realization, it’s also an idea that I’m spending more and more moments pondering. No doubt, timing can make a huge difference when planting, creating guilds, pruning, harvesting, and countless other –ing activities. The cycles of the moon, the change of the seasons, the rate at which things […]

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Friday Five: Obama, Snowden and PDC?

Friday Five: Obama, Snowden and PDC?

Our April 1st edition of the “Friday Five” went out to all our subscribers earlier today. Some of you wanted to sign up but didn’t have a chance to, so I’ve included it below. Moving forward, the Friday Five and my social media accounts will be the main ways I share with you key updates, new videos, and the like. If you enjoy these and don’t want to miss any […]

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