Category: Soil

Biochar: Helps Increase Crop Yields and Mitigates Climate Change

Biochar-Helps-Increase-Crop-Yields-and-Mitigates-Climate-Change-feat

Whenever we hear the word biochar, most of us are thinking that this is not a climate-friendly method since it undergoes combustion process and can aggravate greenhouse effect. Though this is a thousand years old industrial technology technique for soil enhancer, some are still confused if it’s the real deal. Is it, in fact, a too good to be true method for agriculture? What is Biochar? Biochar is a soil […]

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Vermicomposting: How Worms Can Reduce Our Waste

Vermicomposting: How Worms Can Reduce Our Waste

Nearly one third of our food ends up in the trash can. There is hope, however, in the form of worms, which naturally convert organic waste into fertilizer. In this very well illustrated video, Matthew Ross details the steps we can all take to vermicompost at home — and why it makes good business sense to do so. Video Courtesy of Ted Ed For a great article about setting up […]

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Abundance from Small Spaces

Abundance-from-small-spaces

It’s all about habitat. If you create the right habitat, you get what you need. I often ask people, “What is the biggest predator in this garden?” The answer, of course, is “us” because that’s what it’s designed for. Before we were farmers, we were hunter-gatherers. What the word ‘forest’ (from the Anglo-Norman) means is not ‘trees’ at all, but ‘the king’s hunting ground.’ So, what we are doing in creating forest gardens is to get ourselves back as close as we can to being hunter-gatherers: less work, more harvest, no pollution, making the system as self-fertile as possible, recycling wastes into nutrients, and entirely dependent on the best nuclear reactor of all—the sun, and on the rain (or other precipitation) and wind cycles which are driven by the sun’s energy.

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How to Sustainably Manage Agriculture?

Earthworms and soil in hand

Agriculture will always be here no matter what era it is and no matter the technological advancements. But the question will be about if we can apply sustainable practices in our individual farms. Farmers always need to increase yield, reduce input, and get more harvests without worrying about later consequences of some farming practices. The best way to sustainably manage agriculture is to use the bio-organics system. It imitates nature […]

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A Guide to Simple Worm Farming Techniques

Happy Tiger Worms (Courtesy of Timothy Musson)

Even novice gardeners are aware of worms as a driving force in the garden, and this is especially so for those no-till beds so popular in permaculture plots. For most of us, it’s no great revelation that soil thick with worms is also likely to be thick with plant growth. The reasons are many, but in the most basic terms, earthworms are great for aerating soils and transforming organic material […]

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Permaculture Soils Course

Permaculture-Soils-Paul_taylor-Feature

The Permaculture Soils Course redefines ‘sustainable agriculture’ as ‘our ability to build soil fertility as we improve production and reduce cost and labor’. Very few systems are able to achieve this goal in an affordable and achievable way.

You will leave the farm with the tools to be more productive in your backyard, in a greenhouse, on the farm, or in the city.

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‘Silent Spring’ Triggered an Environmental Movement

Silent-Spring-Headline

The book ‘Silent Spring’ triggered an environmental movement and as such we have known the toxic effects of chemical agriculture, basically from the very beginning. We have suffered both massive environmental damage, disease and pest resistance, and human health issues.

Silent Spring is a 1962 environmental science book by Rachel Carson. The book documented the detrimental effects on the environment—particularly on birds—of the indiscriminate use of pesticides.

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Crop Rotation – A Vital Component of Organic Farming

crop rotation feat

Long before we had synthetic fertilisers to maintain the land’s nutrients, and chemical pesticides and herbicides to keeps pests and weeds under control, we had crop rotation. Crop rotation is a system of designing how to cycle a parcel of land through various crops, reducing the reliance on chemical fertilisers, pesticides and herbicides. It is how successful farmers nurtured their land over generations, and remains vitally important for farmers today […]

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Biological Fertiliser – Human Urine

Biological Fertiliser – Human Urine

Human urine provides an excellent source of nitrogen, phosphorous, potassium and trace elements for plants, and can be delivered in a form that’s perfect for assimilation. With a constant, year-round and free supply of this resource available, more and more farmers and gardeners are making use of it.

Urine is 95% water. The other 5% consists of urea (around 2.5%), and a mixture of minerals, salts, hormones and enzymes.

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Comfrey – BELIEVE the HYPE!

Comfrey – BELIEVE the HYPE!

There’s a plethora of info out there about comfrey but not much detail regarding establishing and managing a comfrey patch so I thought I would write an article to share my experience on this and how we grow comfrey as part of our fertility strategy in the market garden. When writing this article I could not resist to include some of the stories of this incredible plant and of the […]

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A Peep Into the Underground Biological Market

Ravindra Krishnamurthy feat

Symbiotic relationship between plants and mychorrhizal fungi has been in existence for over 400 million years. Fungi cannot survive on their own as they are incapable of producing their own food. Hence, they latch on to the plants roots to get essential food. Plants share a part of the carbohydrates produced during photosynthesis and in return, fungi supply phosphates and other minerals, by mining them from the soil. These natural […]

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Did you miss Geoffs’ Latest Top Five – This One Was A Doozy

Did you miss Geoffs' Latest Top Five - This One Was A Doozy feat

Highlights include: • “Magic tricks” that can make water disappear…and appear. • Bill Mollison’s surprising perspective on how to measure gardening success. Hint: It’s not just about output. • My good friend Jack Spirko’s first-ever listener-voted podcast. • An incredible long-form article on solastalgia, a “form of psychic or existential distress caused by environmental change.” • An electric bike coming out of Silicon Valley that uses the same batteries as […]

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